Life Can Be In Tents

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Here in Southern California, many of us are staying home in response to the “Safe at Home” order from California’s governor, Gavin Newsom, to battle the CoVid19 crisis. I’ve often wished for more time at home to get this project done or do that creative project. Now I do have extra time, and I struggle to figure out what to do next.

I watch the news. Although it is hard for me to conceive, experts say things will get harder in the next weeks. I can feel the anxiety that produces. Focus is fleeting in the midst of the uncertainty outside our front doors.

Last Saturday, I needed a break. I needed to do something for a few hours that could take me away from current reality with an engaging activity. It had to take place at home. I got a silly idea. I decided I was going to build a tent at home inside. I returned to a childhood activity that I loved.

I jumped on that idea, and it filled the afternoon with creative fun and sweet play. I found great joy in a stressful time. I feel a little vulnerable sharing this with you due to the high level of silly. This is not something one would typically do alone at my age.

But I really wanted to try. So I’ll share it with you and perhaps encourage you to play more, too. As a responsible 64-year old adult, I rarely take time to play. I had forgotten how great it can feel.

Here are the details of my unusual afternoon adventure. I was only limited by what I could find around the house, the size of the space selected, and my imagination. Every step was freeing and fun. Just plain fun. It also brought cheer by bringing to mind one of the reasons I loved working with fourth graders as a teacher. To play like a kid.

Step 1: Diagram the plan and make lists of things to include.

Step 2: Collect materials and supplies.

  • Crutches: Support beams
  • Pair of old windows: Small french doors for entrance
  • Sheets, quilt, blanket, and variety of pillows: Ceiling, floor, and supplies to get comfortable and cozy.
  • Things to do in tent: Book to read, craft book on lettering, bag of pens for lettering or writing, note writing bag (note cards), and headphones
  • Gauze curtain panel, shelf: Front entrance valence and snack shelf
  • Magazine: For reading and relaxing

Step 3: Construct the tent using the highly technical engineering skill of trial and error.

I cleared the land in between the bed and dresser.
I put down the foundation. The carpet isn’t that clean. My grandmother’s white quilt went in next. I placed it on top of a clean sheet.
Naturally, I went for the laundry basket lift technique and crutches cross bars. Who wouldn’t? As a graduate of Purdue University, an engineering school, some design sense had rubbed off on me, even though I was an Education major. This design made the ceiling high enough for me to be comfortable. Plus, it provided more natural light and air.
The gauze valance was secured to the crutch with clothespins.
Next, I propped the pair of charming old windows at the opening to simulate tiny French doors, to add class, whimsy, and for a creative touch.
Of course a door mat made the entrance more official. You can also see my grandmother’s quilt now in place on the floor for a soft surface.

Step 4: Prepare some snacks for sustenance.

I rummaged through the kitchen and packed up the kind of things a kid would find to eat. Cashews, mini-marshmallows, Trader Joe’s Baked Cheese Crunchies, pretzels, and a banana. For a beverage, I loaded my small pink canteen with ice and sparkling water. Plus, I took a paper straw for my drink to create more of a party feel, and perhaps save an ocean turtle.

Step 5: Get into the tent and enjoy the afternoon.

My view from the inside looking toward the entrance. Getting my chill on.
The snack shelf with all the random goodies within reach. I found a spare shelf and placed it in a pulled out drawer to create this.
I enjoyed creating from my design, building a fun little tent, and relaxing inside for a few hours. “Safe at home” can be intense. Or…in tents.
I snacked, listened to music, read, and wrote a couple notes. I caught my breath. My body, mind, and emotions took a break from the CoVid19 weirdness.
Many of us are working hard to create interesting things to do at home. This was a big winner in my book. I had a blast in this silly seclusion.
At sunset, the globe lanterns came on and the entry way twinkle lights added a little magic, and signalling the end of a fun afternoon and my little tent.

Perhaps you’ve guessed by now that my inspiration tent was the one in the movie Holiday. If you’ve seen the movie, you know the tent. If you haven’t seen it, I won’t give it away.

Once upon a time, many of us had to stay at home for weeks. Many of us will do our best to make the most of it. Though an odd and difficult time, some memories we create will last far beyond this pandemic. I am grateful for these good moments.

Remember, you’re never too old to make the best of a tough time. Stay home. Stay patient. Stay creative. Stay playful.

And stay charming, my friends.

Bunches of Blossoms

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She made it look fun. She shared the ideas on Instragram. Then I wanted to see what I could do. Inspired and encouraged by my friend, Amy, at Tonality Designs, I took a chance and played with flowers this weekend.

We all know that Valentine’s Day was last Friday. We also know that flowers get overpriced, especially roses, at that time of year. Amy showed me a better way. She bought several bunches of flowers at Trader Joe’s and turned them into pretty arrangements to cheer up her home. She shared that the prices were reasonable.

I light heartedly challenged myself to a Valentine’s flower frenzy. I’ve learned that when I get tempted to compare myself to someone else’s creative ability, someone like Amy who does creative things really well, I tell myself, “Don’t miss out! At least try and see what you can do.” So that was my approach, following Amy’s lead and invitation to see what can happen.

I went to Trader Joe’s and bought five random bunches of flowers. Three at $3.99 each, and two at $2.99 each. I looked for the least expensive bunches, and whatever interested me. I don’t know the names of them, and that fits with my level of expertise and motivation to just try. I did get a burgundy bunch and a funky, pink, waxy, bubble bloom. I also got three bunches of white flowers.

And then things came to a screeching halt. At home, I put them in water, still in the packaging cellophane, and there they sat watching me for days. My schedule was busy and time went by. But tonight I got down to business.

I unwrapped the five bunches, gathered a variety of vases and containers on the table, and got going with a plant cutter and regular scissors. I trimmed them, separated them, and poked them into this vase and that glass. I ended up with about nine big and little bouquets of joy which are now scattered around the house. Those five bunches went a long way!

Dining Room Table
All white for the windowsill
Pop of color on the other windowsill
One big vase full, with a smaller jar in front
Next to the bathroom sink
On my desk
More in the bathroom

And I had a great evening! It didn’t take long. The arrangements came out good enough for me. I only spent about $18 for a house full of color and bloom. Awesome! This little adventure brought some playful creativity to my weekend and delight to our home for the week.

Thank you, Amy at Tonality Designs, for making it seem doable. To me, she is an expert on flowers and arranging bouquets, spending many Saturday mornings at the Los Angeles Flower Mart. Her posts on those outings and the results are enjoyable to read, too. So I finally took a chance on a bunch of blooms myself.

You can’t lose with pretty flowers. And like she says, it is always a good idea to buy yourself flowers! She was right. I am glad I tried. It was affordable and easy, when I viewed it as play and not something to enter at the state fair.

Stay charming, my friends! And remember to try something new soon and see how it goes. You might just be pleased. And so glad you did!

Twenty-first Birthdays – Let’s Do Better

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The twenty-first birthday is a milestone in the life of many young adults. Yet the big reward seems to be drinking legally. And probably drinking a lot in one night. Maybe we can do better.

What are we saying about adult life? Have we lost sight of truly celebrating our next generation as they grow to be adults? Have we taken the easy way out on creating a fun time? Is this what we really want them to look forward to? The legal drinking age seems to keep the celebration of reaching adulthood in the shallow end of the pool.

What kind of celebration would better honor this birthday, this rite of passage?

What if it were connected to life steps of accomplishment, instead of simply turning a page on the calendar. Achieving a goal or set of goals would be worthy of celebrating and instill a feeling of pride as one reaches their twenty-first birthday, like purchasing a car, getting car insurance, landing a job, getting a first apartment, finishing a college degree (not often doable by the twenty-first birthday), building a savings account, successful completion of military service, or volunteering or contributing to society. It is interesting to consider, instead of basically saying, “Now that you’ve survived to age twenty-one, have a brew, bro’!”

However, I think celebrating birthdays is celebrating life. Celebrating accomplishments feels like something separate. When we achieve our goals, that’s an additional reason to celebrate. We celebrate what we do at times, but birthdays celebrate who we are, who we are becoming. We pause to honor “being” over “doing.” So maybe accomplishments should be a separate reason to party.

What about those turning twenty-one who aren’t interested in drinking? Can we offer them anything amazing, beautiful, and empowering for them, too?

This can get more creative, especially considering drinking does not go so well for everyone. We can do better at designing a ritual or honoring celebration as we frame turning twenty-one differently.

Here’s one idea, though I don’t see it as a good one. At Purdue in the early 1980’s, the student turning twenty-one got tossed in the local Wabash River by friends. Hopefully, this did not occur in the winter.

Why is drinking the big buzz at twenty-one? Is reaching the legal drinking age what’s important? Let’s celebrate more than that, and make great memories that honor the birthday person with class and thoughtfulness. I’ll check for a Pinterest board to get more good ideas.

Not helpful. But then it’s not up to me, anyway. I’ve been over twenty-one a long time, and celebrated with a banana split on my big day.

Was your twenty-first birthday special? Have you heard any great celebration ideas?

Stay charming, my friends!

Welcome Back, Friends!

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Long Time No See

I apologize for my absence. My last post is dated Tuesday, January 1, 2019, over one year ago. I disappeared to tend to other family matters. To my returning readers, thank you for your patience! To my new readers, welcome to Wild Chin Hair, where we are looking for growth in unexpected places.

Family Matters

My mom celebrated her ninety-fifth birthday in January 2019. Around that time, I became my sweet mom’s personal assistant, taking on her email, mail, and finances, including gathering papers for tax prep. As expected, that placed a demand on my time, plans, and adjusted priorities. It was a loving way to serve her as the business side of everyday life became complicated for her.

This new role also drained my creative energy, since it was stressful and felt like a part time job. Many of you know what I mean, since you’ve been through this or are in similar seasons right now. I needed to press pause on my weekly post. Now I’m back!

Good Grief

My mom was a great mom and caring friend to many, including me. She graciously left this world in the end of May 2019. Although a bittersweet good-bye and not unexpected, I could now trust her to Heaven and wholeness.

Our big yellow lab, Samson #2, also passed in the spring of 2019 on his fifteenth birthday. That was a tremendous loss. We’d shared a great life with him since he was six weeks old. So, again as many of you can relate to, grief moved in when others moved on.

Grief changes us. I suspect forever. For me, grief is an uninvited friend that both stays too long and brought the gifts of intimate lessons, resetting priorities, and a renewed sense of gratitude, depending on the day. A side effect not listed on the warning label is also the energy drain that impacted the creative part of my mind and heart.

Taking Care of Business

On the business end of loss, settling the will, updating information, contacting businesses she dealt with, and reaching out to her dear friends continued through summer and fall. It is almost all quiet now. I am grateful both to have served her in this way, and to see the paperwork drawing to a close.

Also, I forged through the time and energy demands, physical and emotional, to clean out her apartment. On the up side, that motivates me to clean out my own possessions. There is no time when that will be easier than now.

Back to the Blog

So I took the time I needed to finish tasks, feel the emotions, and process this season of life. I stepped away from my blog. Now I’m happy to be back with lots to share. I hope you find helpful, hopeful, and at times humorous posts along the way, and come back often. It is good to be together again.

Stay charming, my friends!

Collecting Small Plastic Art

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I love graphic art, fonts, design. And doodles. I know some of you do, too. I have collected Starbucks Gift Cards just for these elements in different designs. From about 2007 through 2018, I’ve collected gift cards at Starbucks just because I like looking at the designs. Some collect baseball cards. This is a variation on that.

As I continue to simplify my life and my stuff, this weekend I took pictures of my collection. Then I tossed out the cards out into the plastic recycling bin. My collection has ended, but I wanted to share the images. If you are interested in image and design, too, you might enjoy this post. The photos contain the cards that appealed to me. Starbucks produced many, many more cards than pictured here. I wonder how the design team dreams up the looks year after year.

Birthdays, congratulations, and a couple dancing gift cards
California, Los Angeles, and Seattle (home of the original Starbucks) cards
Cups of coffee cards
Coffee shop cards…
Spring and summer cards
Fall cards and a fox
Snowmen
Christmas trees
Christmas, Happy Holidays, and winter cards
Thank you cards…thanks for reading this post!

Stay charming, my friends! Happy 2019!

Well Fed. Well Said.

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Happy Thanksgiving weekend, friends! We traveled to my hometown for turkey dinner and visiting with my family. We had a great meal together at the local Cracker Barrel restaurant. However, I did experience “the empty chair,” since my dad is no longer present at the table. Others have a different sense of longing, after surviving one of the California fires. The empty chair can be a symbol for many situations.

A high school friend shared this blog on her Facebook feed and I would like to feature it in my blog for this week. I could not have said it any better. Well written, sweet truth, and many of us will relate to it. To quote my friend, Lynette, “We all have empty chairs.” I hope, if you have an empty chair in your life, you find this an encouragement.

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Holidays and Empty Chairs

I hope your Thanksgiving was filled with blessings, even if peppered with a sense of longing, of missing. I give myself time and permission feel both, and that’s OK.

Stay charming, my friends. And stay real.

Uberize Me

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Uber Post - Where to

I am grateful there are strangers with clean cars, who drive responsibly, and want to take me places. For a fee. But I don’t mind the fee.

I am also always a little wary of crawling into a car with someone I do not know, trusting them to get me where I need to be. The other side of that coin. There is the tension to be managed.

Although recovery from my summer breakation is going well, I am not yet driving. My ankle will be able to tolerate it one day soon, but this is not that day. So I am dependent on family and friends to play taxi service. And God bless them for their generosity in that practical piece of support!

I don’t miss driving in our Los Angeles area. I rather enjoy being the passenger. But it becomes rather inconvenient and impractical to not be able to drive. It’s a short season, and for that, Uber has been a good resource.

Uber Post - Uber App

Most of my Uber rides have been great, pleasant, and comfortable.

  • Only one car had squeaky breaks, to which the driver commented, “I’ve been meaning to get that fixed.” To which I thought, “As long as they hold until you drop me off, I won’t panic.”
  • Only one commented, “It’s telling me my one tire is low on air. It seems to be losing air. I think I have a nail. I’ll have it checked once I drop you off.” We were two minutes away from my destination, and we hit a rough patch of road at the exact moment he shared that news. The thump-thump-thump-thump sound of the tires did get my attention, but it passed quickly, once we got on smoother road.
  • Only a few seemed to lack confidence in speaking English. We got along fine. However, giving directions from the back seat in English didn’t work so well. I ended up leaning into the front seat to wave “left turn” or “right turn.” The Uber map system, whatever GPS system they are using, directs them to use a road to get to work that has no entrance any longer.
  • That same map system directs them to pick me up in the alley behind our home. I circumvent that with a quick text message while I wait for the driver to arrive.
  • Only one was blasting a certain genre of rock music that was too loud and too metal for my taste, raised in a James Taylor and Doobie Brothers era. But I changed my attitude and head banged to Heart’s Crazy on You as we traveled together. The young female driver deserved a good sport in the back seat. Windows down. Hair in the air like I just didn’t care. It’s all good. Can I borrow your comb?

Uber arrives quickly after I place a request. No money is exchanged. The driver is identified by name, car description, rating by other customers, and number of rides given. That’s helpful. They don’t get paid until they complete the ride. I like these features.

It is fun to watch the app on my phone. It shows a map with a tiny car approaching your pick-up destination and communicates how long it will be until they will arrive. Helpful.

Uber Post - Ants on the Road

See the little ants on the map pictures above? Those are Uber drivers in my area when I took that screen shot of the app.

I’ve Ubered a lot in the last few weeks. It’s worked well for me and those who have been helping with transportation when they can. I hope to be driving again soon, but in the meantime, I’m grateful for Uber. It’s not cheap. But neither is owning and operating your own car. It’s a service I need right now.

Uber Post - My Trips

Let me also give a shout out to the great friends and family who have pitched in with transportation over these last months. I couldn’t have made it this far without you! Thank you.

Stay charming, my friends! I hope you get where you’re going this week!

Weekends Are for New Recipes

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Sometimes a slow Saturday is perfect for slow cooking. And fall is always a good time for a hearty stew. Weekends sometimes bring a break in busy schedules affording time to prep, cook, clean-up, and the energy to do it. So I took the time and had some fun on a recent Saturday afternoon chopping, measuring, and prepping our dinner to try a new stew recipe.

The new recipe I wanted to try was Hearty Pork & Ale Stew, from Midwest Living magazine. It’s described as “This main-dish stew celebrates autumn with assorted root vegetables, apples, and tomatoes simmered with melt-in-your-mouth pork sirloin.

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Hearty Pork & Ale Stew Recipe

Slow cooking can be so relaxing. It’s definitely rewarding. I love combining ingredients, smelling the aroma while cooking, and then tasting the result. All that work to feed people you love good food brings a feeling of satisfaction. Not to mention the fun suspense of trying a new recipe. Would it come out right? Would we both like it?

The challenge was this. After sitting around for three months during broken ankle and surgery recovery, would I have the stamina? I did. It went well. I had a good time. We enjoyed a delicious stew for dinner on a lovely fall (91 degrees) evening, while watching Purdue University (I’m a graduate and fan) surprise undefeated Ohio State (I’m a Buckeye fan by birth) with an upset.

Back to the stew…I found the recipe in the book Seasons of the Heartland. I’ve provided the link to the online recipe in the beginning of the blog. (Just click on Hearty Pork & Ale Stew above.)

 

Pork & Ale Stew Dijon Mustard 10-20-18

I typically overlook one ingredient when checking to make sure I have everything. This time it was Dijon mustard. I discovered we were out as I was browning the meat. I was sure we had it, but didn’t check in advance. My husband to the rescue! He dashed to the store and was back just in time for me to add it in. Practical love.

One of the interesting things about this recipe for me was the inclusion of Granny Smith apples and tomatoes. Tomatoes are common in soups, but tomatoes and tart apples seemed unusual to me. Plus, I’d never had apples in a stew. It was interesting and delicious.

A fun afternoon. Lots to clean up because, as usual, I dirty plenty of bowls, cutting boards, spoons, knives, and measuring spoons and fill the entire counter. My husband, who cleans as he goes (he’s a good cook!), hasn’t been able to break me of this habit. That’s why when I cook, I clean. When he cooks, he cleans. Marriage rule from the early days.

The stew was delicious and offered a variety of interesting flavors and textures. I plan to make it again. Looki leftovers – another gift of slow cooking.

Pork & Ale Stew 1 10-20-18

Stay charming, my friends! And eat well in this season.

 

 

Good Old Dog Days

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Puppies - Sam's Litter

Samson 2 was born in March 2004, the same month our previous dog, Samson, passed away. Some of his brothers and sisters are pictured above in a photo the breeder sent prior to picking him out. We brought him home from the breeder in April 2004 at about six-weeks old. We began raising a puppy, a challenging time with great reward. I had no idea how much time and consistency it would take to help him grow healthy, happy, and well-behaved. He’s been our best beast ever since. His breed, the Labrador Retriever, is known for their amazing and loving temperament, and he was no exception.

Sam - Bringing Home Sam 2

I got to hold Sam on the car ride home.

When we got home, we introduced him to Ashley, our mature black lab. We had adopted her years earlier from another home. She helped train and entertain puppy Sam, as transition dogs do. She granted us time off from playing. He would climb over her and bug her. She’d look at us as if she were thinking, “What have you done?” Raising a puppy demanded time and energy from all of us.

The video below, taken on an old flip phone – pardon the low quality, demonstrates the energy Sam brought to our home. I think Ashley is safely in the background, and you can barely see her. He was a crazy spinning dog, and eventually out grew that tendency. We were grateful.

 

When he was new to us, he was so tiny in his crate which he soon grew to fill.

Sam - Baby in the Crate

We took him to puppy training school. So many friends post photos of back-to-school moments. I was happy to capture one of Sam.

Sam - Puppy School

Our young grand-nieces, Brianna (in blue) and Abby (in pink), enjoyed visiting Sam.

Sam - Brianna Kisses Sam

Sam with Abby

Fast forward to now, Sam 2 is fourteen years and seven months old, outlasting the life expectancy of labs which is supposedly twelve to fourteen years. He is in his late eighties in dog years. That is old. He still eats and drinks well, shows interest in people, moves around the house and the yard, but he struggles.

Samson on Bed - Sitting Up

At this point, he cannot hear very well. We still talk to him in complete sentences and repeat commands. Like that will work. It doesn’t, but we forget and try anyway. Getting up is difficult, more difficult some days than others, but he never gives up and works at it. That may actually keep some muscles stronger.

Sam does seem confused at times. He doesn’t always get outside to do his “business.” Almost daily we go on an “Easter egg hunt” to see where those indoor dog logs have been laid. We are comfortable with that now. It is what it is. We keep our clean-up supplies around the house: rolls of paper towels and Thieves cleaning solution in a spray bottle. We limit the rooms where he can wander. We are grateful it is usually solid waste.

We feel privileged to have shared life with this dog for so many years. He is still good company.  He’s shared his gentle ways with our toddler guests. We hope he will make it very clear to us when he’s done with his work here, and then we will grant him rest. Many of you know this path we are on. You can appreciate the dread of the pending loss of man’s best friend and the heartache that will follow. We are in the good company of friends and we’ve shared those days in the past for many beloved dogs gone on.

Our young housemate, Oliver, also enjoyed time with Sam.

Oliver with Sam

 

Oliver in Jammies with Sam

 

One of our earlier housemates, Pete, often played with Sam, as shown in this video.

 

In the meantime, we will enjoy him every day. We will smile when he seems to be running free in his sleep. We will giggle at his old man snoring. We will envy him for all the naps he takes. We will pet him, feed him, thank him, and make his days the best they can be. What a grand gift a good dog is to living life well! Of course when you risk loving, you risk loss. That’s OK. It’s still worth it. Good dogs are forever in our hearts.

Cindi (feet) and Sam on Porch Side-by-Side

Samson Close Up w Tongue - 8-2018

Stay charming, my friends! Cheers for life with good pets!

Who Loves Fall?

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October 2018 Calendar

Welcome Fall

I know I’m not alone when it comes to enjoying the season of autumn. Days become shorter. Sunsets seem more stunning. Temperatures start to cool off. Well, around here, there is no real guarantee of that, unless we are in the mountains. But you know what I mean. For me, fall means we are heading into some holidays that I really enjoy, too.

Fall Flavors & Cooking

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Pumpkin Pie with Peanut Brittle Topping

Do you have favorite recipes that come to mind and start your cravings when your calendar turns to October? Perhaps something with butternut squash or a pork loin roasted with sage? I have to give a nod to all things pumpkin, too. Although I’m not a pumpkin latte fan, I accept that many of you are. But slice up a homemade pumpkin pie, add a little fresh whip cream, and I’m ready with my fork. My mom always sprinkled the whip cream with small chunks of peanut brittle. Delicious! I continue that tradition in our home, though not everyone is as interested in that as I am.

Fall Color & Decor

I live in Southern California, so we have to create our own fall. Some trees near our home are changing color. Pink. They have large pink blossoms during this season. What? That always makes me laugh.

Pink Trees

The trees along one street in our neighborhood all bloom in bright pink blossoms in the fall. I took this photo at sunset. Though they kind of look orange, I assure you they are pink! Not a fall color in my mind.

The Japanese maples in our town will turn to beautiful fall colors, more orange and red, but not until December. That’s OK. I still like to see the bright colors. This year, I purchased a maple leaf garland that reminds me of Midwest leaves floating in the breeze to the ground. It’s a colorful addition to our den.

I recently purchased some table runners for our large dining table to set a fall mood. This is part of simplifying seasonal decorations, to have simpler storage when not in use. It is fun at add simple visual hints of the season or holiday. Table runners are perfect to fold and put away until next time.

In addition, I create some focal points, like many of you do as well, with tiny pumpkins from Trader Joe’s around the house for a pop of fall color. Those can be tossed at the end of the season. No storage needed. Sometimes I toss them in a field to feed some critters. I like to fill a small glass vase with candy corn. That decoration seems to disappear by the time trick-or-treating is over. And, of course, faux candles with timers warm the home with light. Candles can be used all year.

 

Fall Books & Ideas

The beautiful books and magazines that feature fall photography, recipes, and decor ideas are fun to read. That helps get in the fall spirit out here in California. I grew up in the Midwest, so I’ve experienced the full fall tree colors, authentic hay rides, a reason to own sweaters, and chili suppers that do not include jalapenos. Here are two of my favorite seasonal books: Autumn, by Susan Branch, and Seasons of the Heartland, by Midwest Living.

 

Home for the Holiday

Although the leaves will have fallen to the ground by late November, I’m looking forward to a Thanksgiving visit to my hometown in northeastern Ohio to get a sense of autumn, similar to my growing up years. It will be cool weather, and we may even see some light snow.

Closing Thoughts

Two additional notes. Ironically, orange is my least favorite color. Unless it is September, October, and November. And, ironically, fall has other meanings, especially for me this year. I’m not sure any literal fall is happy, unless you fall in love, fall into bed, or fall into a big pile of leaves. See last week’s post for details on a recent fall that was NOT a favorite season. So, happy autumn and enjoy your fall…in the seasonal sense.

Happy Fall - Close Up - Fall 2018

What are the ways you enjoy the fall season? I hope you, too, find joy in the season. Join family or friends for soup and apple crisp sometime soon, or your fall food of choice!

Stay charming, my friends!